• Entry period open for Detroit District annual photo contest

    The Detroit District invites photographers to enter its 7th annual photo contest featuring U.S. Army Corps of Engineers sites across the Great Lakes. The top 12 photographs highlighting Detroit District Great Lakes projects such as the Soo Locks, Duluth Ship Canal, piers, breakwaters or federal channels and harbors will earn a spot in the 2023 downloadable calendar. The entry deadline is 11:59 p.m. July 4, with winners determined by social media vote. The Soo Locks Visitors Center Association will award the top three photographers a plaque featuring their photo. “The photo contest is an exciting way for us to connect with our community,” said District Commander Lt. Col. Scott Katalenich. “We are pleased to continue the tradition and look forward to seeing all of the great submissions.”
  • MacArthur Lock opening after seasonal maintenance, extended repair

    The Soo Locks’ MacArthur Lock will open to marine traffic June 19, 2022, after completing a critical repair that took longer than expected. The MacArthur lock was set to reopen in late April but replacing the almost 79-year-old tainter valve machinery, original to the lock built in 1943, caused the closure’s 59-day extension. “The tainter valve machinery replacement contract was a very large task,” Soo Locks Construction Chief Nicholas Pettit said. “The original machinery had to be cut into pieces and removed by crane out through a small access tunnel. The new machinery had to be fabricated in sections, lowered by crane in through the small tunnel and installed inside of the lock.”
  • Corps of Engineers expedites Muskegon Harbor dredging, could begin Friday

    DETROIT – The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers officials anticipate Muskegon Harbor dredging could begin as early as Friday or Saturday depending on weather. The President’s Fiscal Year 2022 Budget included operations and maintenance funding for Muskegon Harbor with the Corps of Engineers expecting to award a contract later in the year. However, the commercial bulk carrier M/V Kaye E. Barker ran aground on a sand bar at the harbor’s entrance April 28. “Winter ice and waves can move a lot of material around in the water,” said Muskegon Harbor Project Manager Mike Allis. “The Detroit District quickly sent a survey vessel from our Grand Haven office to check the area following the grounding.”
  • Corps of Engineers to host virtual open house for potential industry partners, contractors

    DETROIT- The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Detroit District, invites business representatives to attend Industry Open House virtually from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. June 7. This annual event is open to all businesses wanting to work with the Detroit District. Attendees will have the opportunity to introduce their unique capabilities to district officials, learn about future district projects and network with district staff and industry partners. “This is an excellent opportunity for our industry partners to interact with us,” Detroit District Deputy for Small Business Programs Scott Vincent said. “We are excited to help position our mission partners where they might find an opportunity to bid on projects with the Corps of Engineers or other federal agencies.”
  • Great Lakes’ infrastructure grows $31.5 million stronger from Work Plan, Consolidated Appropriations Act

    DETROIT- The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Detroit District, is receiving nearly $26.7 million in the Fiscal Year 2022 Work Plan for operations and maintenance of Michigan river and harbor projects. The FY22 Work Plan funding is in addition to the $4.8 million from the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2022, $117.2 million of FY22 President’s Budget and $561 million of FY22 funding from the Infrastructure Investments and Jobs Act. “This is exciting for the Detroit District to be able to provide engineering solutions to Great Lakes region infrastructure with these historic investments,” said Detroit District Commander Lt. Col. Scott Katalenich. “It will be challenging, especially with today’s unprecedented global supply chain disruptions and workforce challenges, but repairing, maintaining, and improving our harbors and federal navigation channels is essential to the economic strength of our Nation.”
  • Corps of Engineers to replenish Michigan’s eroding beaches

    DETROIT- The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will use western Michigan harbor dredge material to nourish and replenish Lake Michigan beaches from recent high water level erosion. “Nourishing beaches using shoaled sand into these harbors rather than trucking in new material is very functional and cost effective,” said Grand Haven Resident Engineer Elizabeth Newell Wilkinson. “It allows for both dredging and beach nourishment.” The Corps of Engineers sampled and analyzed the harbor dredged material to determine if it is suitable for beneficial reuse as nearshore nourishment material. The sampling results indicate the proposed outer harbor dredge material is suitable for beneficial reuse as nourishment material. The Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes and Energy (EGLE) issued Clean Water Act Section 401 Water Quality Certifications for these projects.
  • Corps of Engineers share May-Oct. water level outlook

    U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Hydraulics and Hydrology officials forecast Great Lakes water levels to continue seasonal rise. From the shores of Lake Superior, Detroit District Watershed Hydrology Section Chief Keith Kompoltowicz discusses the latest six-month water level forecast in the seventh ‘On the Level’ video, available on the district’s YouTube page at https://youtu.be/imwYDUBbMd0. “Lake Superior’s water level in April was about an inch below its long-term average,” according to Kompoltowicz. “Looking at the forecast for the next 6 months, Superior’s level should remain near average. In looking at the rest of the Great Lakes system, Lakes Michigan-Huron, St. Clair, Erie and Ontario are above their respective long term average levels, but well below the record high levels recently experienced.”
  • Soo Locks Visitor Center opens for 2022 season

    SAULT STE. MARIE, Mich., – The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is opening the Soo Locks Visitor Center in Canal Park at 10 a.m. May 8. Visitor Center hours for the month of May are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., closed on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Visitor Center hours and days for June will be re-evaluated and announced prior to Memorial Day. “We are excited to open the Visitor Center after a long winter,” Chief Park Ranger Michelle Briggs said. “This year, in addition to updated exhibits, we have a new water safety program with goody bags we hope all will enjoy.”
  • New Lock at the Soo to host hybrid public meeting for Hydro Plant tail race closing

    SAULT STE. MARIE, Mich.- U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Detroit District will host a hybrid public meeting 7 p.m., April 20, 2022, to talk about the need for closing the Soo Locks Hydro Plant tail race. The Detroit District needs to close the Hydro Plant tail race for upcoming New Lock at the Soo construction and permanently close a portion of the tail race for safety reasons. The Corps of Engineers wants to hear from anglers and concerned stakeholders before making any official decisions. The tail race is and has been a very popular community fishing spot. The Corps of Engineers goal during New Lock at the Soo construction is to have minimal effects to the community. Participants can attend in-person or virtually.
  • President’s Budget supplies $117.2 million for Corps of Engineers Detroit District Operation, Maintenance

    DETROIT- The President’s Budget for fiscal year 2023 includes more than $6.6 billion in discretionary funding for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Civil Works program, with just over $117.2 million set aside for Detroit District projects. Of great regional significance is an additional $600,000 for the Great Lakes Coastal Resiliency Study, a project that includes the three Great Lakes districts: Detroit, Buffalo and Chicago. The goal is to create a plan identifying vulnerable coastal areas and recommending actions to bolster the coastal resources’ ability to withstand, recover from and adapt to future hydrologic uncertainty with respect to built and natural coastal environments. Recent high-water events across the Great Lakes brought about the study’s need.