US Army Corps of Engineers
Detroit District

Technical/Planning Assistance

The Corps of Engineers may help resolve water resource problems for, and provide technical assistance to, states, indian tribes, environmental organizations and local governments. The Corps also provides assistance to these groups when preparing plans and initiating actions to manage water and related land resource issues themselves. This section includes an overview of the Corps programs with special emphasis on small cost-shared projects under the Continuing Authority Program.

Included is information on project criteria and project process with explanations about what these programs can do. There are instructions on how to request assistance. As you read through the material, you will notice a section number preceding the name of Contuing Authority Programs. The section number is in reference to the public law that provided the Corps the authority to do that type of project. Both authority and appropriations (funding) for Corps projects are provided by Congress.

Follow the links in the modules below for information on Corps programs:

Programs Requiring Specific Authorization

Continuing Authority Programs

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Continuing Authority Programs

Cost Share: Federal/Non-Federal Federal Project Limit

Section 107 Navigation

80% / 20%, 75% / 25%, or 50% / 50%, depending on depth

$10.0 million

Overview.  Section 107 of the River and Harbor Act of 1960 provides authority for the Corps of Engineers to improve navigation, including dredging of channels, anchorage areas, and turning basins and construction of breakwaters, jetties and groins, through a partnership with non-federal government sponsor such as cities, counties, special chartered authorities (such as port authorities), or units of state government.  The maximum federal cost for project development and construction of any one project is $10.0 million and each project must be economically justified, environmentally sound, and technically feasible.

The Corps does not participate in the cost of dredging berthing areas, slip space, access to individual private docks, or the construction of piers, ramps and other shore facilities.  The sponsoring community must agree to construct and maintain at local cost a public landing sufficient to serve the type and number of commercial boats for which the Federal project is designed.

Cost Sharing Requirements.  Projects are undertaken on a cost-shared basis.  The feasibility study is 100 percent federally funded up to $100,000.  Feasibility study costs in excess of $100,000 must be shared equally by the federal government and the local sponsor.  The local sponsor is also required to provide 10 percent of the cost of developing plans and specifications.  The local sponsor's share of construction costs for navigation projects with a design depth of 20 feet or less is 10 percent up-front and 10 percent after construction over a period of up to 30-years.  For design depths of 20 to 45 feet the up-front share increases to 25 percent, and for depths over 45 feet, to 50 percent.

Project Process.   The first step in the process is completion of an initial appraisal that determines if there is federal interest in participating in a feasibility study.  The initial appraisal is primarily an economic evaluation that results in a preliminary estimate of potential project costs and benefits and provides a decision-making tool for the Corps and local sponsor to determine if they want to share in the cost of a feasibility study.   If a federal interest is identified, the Corps and the sponsor enter into a cost-sharing agreement for the feasibility study.  If the feasibility study produces a solution that meets economic, environmental, and local partnership requirements, then the Corps prepares plans and specifications and manages construction of the project and, upon completion, the future management of projects with depths of 45 feet or less. 

 

 

Study Cost Project Cost
The feasibility study is 100% federally funded up to $100,000. Costs over the $100,000 are shared 50/50 with the non-federal sponsor. 

Non-federal cost is 10% up-front during construction and 10% over a 30-year period for harbors with a design depth of 20 feet or less.  For design depths of 20 to 45 feet, the up-front share increases to 25%, and at over 45 feet the u-front share is 50%.    

 How to Request Assistance.  For more information on our navigation improvement program,  call the Outreach Coordinator, at (313) 226-3387.  Requests for assistance should be in the form of a Letter submitted from a state or local government agency to the address shown below.

 

Sample Letter of Intent for Section 107 Small Navigation Projects.

                              

(LETTERHEAD OF LOCAL SPONSOR)

 

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers – Detroit District

Chief of Planning Office, 7th Floor

477 Michigan Avenue

Detroit, MI 48226-2550

 

Dear Sir:

This letter is to seek the assistance of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers under

(Reference the authority under which assistance is requested and identify the type and location of the problem.)

(Briefly describe your perception of the nature and severity of the problem.)

 

 

(Briefly describe the known issues which would affect the acceptability of any recommended solutions, from the perspective of municipal and local governments, and/or the public.)

We are aware as local sponsor that we will assume costs for lands, easements, right-of-way, relocations and disposal areas (LERRD) and/or assume costs to demonstrate ownership of such.  We also will assume responsibility for any operation and maintenance of the project. Your consideration of this request will be appreciated.  Please contact (name, address, telephone, etc.) for further coordination.

 

 

Sincerely,

(Agency Official)

Continuing Authority Programs

Cost Share: Federal/Non-Federal Federal Project Limit

Section 111 Mitigation of Shore Damage Attributable to Navigation Works

Costs are shared in the same manner as the project causing the erosion or shoaling. $10.0 million

Overview.  Section 111 of the 1968 River and Harbor Act provides authority for the Corps of Engineers to develop and construct projects for prevention or mitigation of damages caused by Federal navigation work. This applies to both publicly and privately owned shores located along the coastal shorelines of the United States. Each project is limited to a federal cost of not more than $10.0 million.

How to Request Assistance.  The Corps can initiate an investigation of a prospective mitigation of damages project upon receipt of a request from a sponsoring agency empowered under state law to provide the required local cooperation. See sample letters requesting a study.

Limitations of Authority.  This authority may not be used to construct works for prevention or mitigation of shore damage caused by riverbank erosion or vessel-generated wave wash, nor may it be used to prevent or mitigate shore damage caused by non-federal navigaiton projects.

Criteria for a Favorable Recommendation.  A recommendation to construct a project to prevent or mitigate shore damage attributable to a federal navigation project may be considered when both of the following conditions exist:

  • The navigation project has been determined to be the cause of the damage, and abandonment of the navigation project is not the most viable solution.
  • Analysis based on sound engineering and economic principles clearly demonstrates the feasibility of the proposed work.

Cost Sharing.  Construction Requirements for federal cost sharing are as follows:

  • If the work recommended is confined to mitigation work where erosion was totally caused by the federal navigation works, costs are shared in the same manner as the project causing the problem.
  • If the work recommended is a combination of mitigation and restoration of beaches eroded due to other causes, mitigation work will be shared in the same manner as the project causing the erosion or shoaling and the remaining work will be 100 percent local, unless it qualifies as a Federal beach erosion control project.

How to request assistance is below:

 

Example of Study Request Letter
Mitigation of Shore Damage Attributable to Navigation Works
Section 111 of the River and Harbor Act of 1968, as amended

District Engineer
US Army Corps of Engineers Detroit District
Attention: CELRE-PD
477 Michigan Avenue
Detroit, MI  48226-2575

Dear Sir or Madam,

(Briefly discuss need for study and nature, extent and source of problem and provide any other available information such as estimated impacts if failure occurs, etc.)

I request that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Detroit District, undertake an investigation under the authority of Section 111 of the River and Harbor Act of 1968, as amended. (Local official government entity) is willing to serve as the study sponsor.

I understand that the study would be Federally financed and 100 percent Federally funded to the limit of $100,000. If the total cost of the study exceeds $100,000, I understand that the remaining study costs will be shared equally between the Corps and (local government entity).

If studies indicate a viable solution, our mutual objective will be to proceed with construction within 12 months of initiating the PDA. We are capable of fulfilling our financial obligations; in general, providing a minimum of 35 percent of the total project costs, including furnishing lands, easements, rights-of-way, relocations and disposal areas, and we will operate and maintain the project upon completion.

We are also aware that both the Corps and our responsibilities will be delineated in a Project Coorperation Agreement, which both parties will execute before construction commences.

If you need addition information, please contact (designee) at (telephone number).

Sincerely,

(Local Official)

Water Resources Planning
Sample Cost Sharing Agreement between the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and (Sponsor's Name)

THIS AGREEMENT, entered into this _______ day of __________, by and between the United States of America (hereinafter called the "Government"), represented by the Contracting Officer executing this Agreement, and (Name of the Requesting State Entity or Tribe)(hereinafter called the "Sponsor"). WITNESSETH, that WHEREAS, the Congress has authorized the Corps of Engineers in Section 22 of the Water Resources Development Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-251) as amended to assist the States in the preparation of comprehensive plans for the development, utilization and conservation of water and related land resources; and whereas, Section 319 of the Water Resources Development Act of 1990 (Public Law 101-640) authorized the Government to collect from non-Federal entities fees for the purpose of recovering fifty (50) percent of the cost of the program; and, WHEREAS, the Sponsor has reviewed the State's comprehensive water plans and identified the need for the planning assistance as described in a Scope of Studies; (Name of the study which is described in Appendix A), incorporated into this agreement; and WHEREAS, the Sponsor has the authority and capability to furnish the cooperation hereinafter set forth and is willing to participate in study cost-sharing and financing in accordance with the terms of this agreement; NOW THEREFORE, the parties agree as follows:

1. The Government, using funds contributed by the Sponsor and appropriated by the Congress, shall expeditiously prosecute and complete the Study, estimated to be completed within twelve (12) months, substantially in compliance with the Scope of Studies attached as Appendix A and in conformity with applicable Federal laws and regulations and mutually acceptable standards of engineering practice.

2. The Government and the Sponsor shall contribute in cash, fifty (50) percent and fifty (50) percent, respectively, of all study costs, the total cost of which is currently estimated to be $_____, as specified in the cost estimate attached as Appendix B. The Sponsor agrees to provide a cashier or certified check in the amount of $_____ which shall be made payable to FAO, USAED, (District Office), prior to any work being performed under this Agreement.

3. No Federal funds may be used to meet the local Sponsor share of study costs under this Agreement unless the expenditure of such funds is expressly authorized by statute as verified by the granting agency.

4. Before any Party to the Agreement may bring suit in any court concerning any issue relating to this Agreement, such Party must first seek in good faith to resolve the issue through negotiation or another form of nonbinding alternate dispute resolution mutually acceptable to the Parties.

5. In the event that any one or more of the provisions of this Agreement is found to be invalid, illegal, or unenforceable, by a court of competent jurisdiction, the validity of the remaining provisions shall not in any way be affected or impaired and shall continue in effect until the Agreement is completed. /

6. This Agreement shall become effective upon the signature of both Parties.

For the Sponsor:

By: ______________________________ Title:_____________________________

Date:____________________________

For the Corps:

By:_______________________________ Title:_____________________________

Date:_____________________________

 

Continuing Authority Programs

Cost Share: Federal/Non-Federal Federal Project Limit

Section 1135 Project Modifications for Improvements to the Environment

75% / 25% $10.0 million

 

Authority and Scope: Section 1135 of the Water Resources Development Act of 1986, as amended, authorizes the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to make modifications to operations or structures of civil works projects previously constructed by USACE, for the purpose of improving the quality of the environment. In most cases, it must be demonstrated that the operation or construction of a civil works project has degraded the quality of the environment. The primary objective of Section 1135 is to modify existing USACE projects to restore ecosystem habitats. Each project is limited to a Federal cost of $10.0 million and requires cost sharing from an authorized non-Federal sponsor (see below).

Project Phases and Funding: Section 1135 projects start with the Feasibility Phase. Initially the feasibility phase is funded 100% Federally and up to a limit of $100,000. Feasibility phase costs above $100,000 are cost-shared 50% Federal and 50% non-Federal. After approval of the feasibility report, the project enters the Design and Implementation Phase. Costs of the Design and Implementation Phse are shared 75% Federal and 25% non-Federal with the non-Federal sponsor given credit for lands, easements, rights-of-way and relocations and some other costs. Operation, maintenance, repair, rehabilitation and replacement of the project in the future is at 100% non-Federal costs.

Non-Federal Responsibilities: Formal assurance of local cooperation must be furnished by a local sponsoring agency. The local sponsor must be a public agency or a non-profit environmental organization. Private interests may also qualify if there is no requirement for future operation and maintenance of the project modification. The sponsoring agency must normally agree to:

   a.  Provide without cost to the United States all necessary lands, easements, rights-of-way, access routes and relocation of utilities necessary for project construction and subsequent operation and maintenance of the project. Costs associated with these items may be creditable towards the non-Federal cash contribution for the project.
   b.  Provide 25% of the total design and implementation costs. All costs associated with the operation, maintenancce, repair, rehabilitation and replacement of the project modification will be the responsibility of the non-Federal sponsor.
   c.  Maintain and operate the project after completion without cost to the United States.

How to Request Assistance: A study of a prospective Section 1135 will be initiated after receipt of a written request (see sample below), from an authorized sponsoring agency (see non-Federal Responsibilities above), and provided Federal funds are available.

 

 



 

Letter of Intent for Section 1135 Environmental Restoration

 

(LETTERHEAD OF LOCAL SPONSOR)

 

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers – Detroit District

Chief of Planning Office, 7th Floor

477 Michigan Avenue

Detroit, MI 48226-2550

 

Dear Sir:

In accordance with the provisions of Section 1135 of the Water Resources Development Act of 1986, as amended, the (state, city, county, town) is requesting U.S. Army Corps of Engineers assistance in addressing an ecosystem restoration problem at (name and location of the degradation caused by a federal project).

 

We are fully aware of the following non-Federal requirements associated with projects under the Section 1135 authority.

Feasibility Phase: The first $100,000 is funded by the Federal government. Costs above $100,000 are shared 50% Federal and 50% non-Federal.

Design and Implementation Phase: The non-Federal sponsor is responsible for costs of all lands, easements, relocations and disposal areas. If this amount is less that 25% of the total project cost, the non-Federal sponsor must provide either in-kind services or an additional cash contribution to make the total equal 25% of the total project cost.

We are aware that this letter serves as an expression of non-Federal intent to cooperate on this project and is not a contract obligation. Either party may discontinue this effort at any point prior to construction.

(Add any additional information or discussion desired).

Signed by a Director, Mayor, Town Manager or his/her representative

 

 

Continuing Authority Programs

Cost Share: Federal/Non-Federal Federal Project Limit

Section 204 Beneficial Use of Dredged Material

65% / 35% of costs above baseline $10.0 million

 

 

Authority and Scope: Section 204 of the Water Resources Development Act of 1992, as amended, authorizes the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to implement projects for the protection, restoration and creation of aquatic and ecologically related habitats, including wetlands, or to reduce storm damage to property, in connection with dredging for the construction or operations and maintenance of an existing authorized Federal navigation project. There is a $10.0 million federal project limit.

Project Phases and Funding: Section 204 projects start with the Feasbility Phase which is funded 100% federally. After approval of the feasibility report, the project enters the Design and Implementation Phase. Costs of the Design and Implementation Phase are shared 65% Federal and 35% non-Federal with the non-Federal sponsor given credit for lands, easements, rights of way and relocation and some other costs. Operation, maintenance, repair, rehabilitation and replacement of the project in the future is at 100% non-Federal cost.

Non-Federal Responsibilities: Formal assurance of local cooperation must be furnished by a local sponsoring agency. The local sponsor must be a public agency or a non-profit environmental organization. Private interests may also qualify if there is no requirement for future operation and maintenance of the project modification. The sponsoring agency must normally agree to:

   a.  Provide without cost to the United States, all necessary lands, easements, rights-of-way, access routes and relocation of utilities necessary for project construction and subsequent operation and maintenance of the project.
   b.  Provide 35% of the Design and Implementation Phase costs.
   c.  Maintain and operate the project after completion without cost to the United States.

How to Request Assistance: A study of a prospective Section 204 project will be initiated after receipt of a written request (see sample below), from an authorized sponsoring agency (see non-Federal Responsibilities above), and provided Federal funds are available.

 

Letter of Intent for Section 204 Beneficial Use of Dredged Material

 

(LETTERHEAD OF LOCAL SPONSOR)

 

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers – Detroit District

Chief of Planning Office, 7th Floor

477 Michigan Avenue

Detroit, MI 48226-2550

 

Dear Sir:

In accordance with the provisions of Section 204 of the Water Resources Development Act of 1992, as amended, the (state, city, county, town, non-profit organization) is requesting U.S. Army Corps of Engineers assistance in addressing an ecosystem restoration or storm damage protection problem using dredged material at (name and location of the project opportunity with an associated federal navigation project).

We are fully aware of the following non-Federal requirements associated with projects under the Section 204 authority.

Feasibility Phase: Funded 100% by the Federal government.

Design and Implementation Phase: The non-Federal sponsor is responsible for costs of all lands, easements, relocations and disposal areas. If this amount is less that 35% of the total project cost, the non-Federal sponsor must provide either in-kind services or an additional cash contribution to make the total equal 35% of the total project cost.

We are aware that this letter serves as an expression of non-Federal intent to cooperate on this project and is not a contract obligation. Either party may discontinue this effort at any point prior to construction.

(Add any additional information or discussion desired).

Signed by a Director, Mayor, Town Manager or his/her representative

Continuing Authority Programs

Cost Share: Federal/Non-Federal Federal Project Limit

Section 205 Flood Control

Varies $10.0 million

Overview. Section 205 of the 1948 Flood Control Act authorizes the Corps of Engineers to plan, design, and construct structural and non-structural flood control projects in partnership with non-Federal government agencies, such as cities, counties, special authorities, or units of state government.  Projects are planned and designed under this authority to provide the same complete flood risk management project that would be provided under specific congressional authorizations.  The maximum federal cost for planning, design, and construction of any one project is $10.0 million.  Each project must be economically justified, environmentally sound, and technically feasible.  Flood risk management projects are not limited to any particular type of improvement.  Levee and channel modifications are examples of flood risk management projects constructed utilizing the Section 205 authority.

Cost Sharing Requirements. The feasibility study is 100% federally funded up to $100,000. Costs over $100,000 are shared equally with the non-federal sponsor. Up to one-half of the non-federal share can be in the form of in-kind services. Costs for preparation of plans and specifications are shared at 65 percent federal/35 percent non-federal (Construction cost-share varies between 50% and 65% Federal, based on the type [structural or non-structural] solution). The non-federal share of construction consists of provision of any necessary lands, easements, rights-of-way, relocations and disposal areas (LERRD), plus a cash contribution of 5% of the total project costs. In the event that the value of LERRD, plus 5% cash, does not equal at least 35% of the total project cost, the non-federal sponsor must contribute additional cash to pay their share. If LERRD plus 5% exceeds 35%, the sponsor is responsible up to a maximum of 50% of the total project costs.

Project Process. In response to a written request from a potential non-federal sponsor, the Corps conducts an initial appraisal early in the Feasibility Study to determine whether the project meets program criteria and provides a basis for determining scope and cost of an entire feasibility study. The solution must be economically feasible and environmentally acceptable. If an acceptable solution is identified in the feasibility study, the Corps prepares plans and specifications, then manages construction of the project.

 

Study Cost Project Cost
The feasibility study is 100% federally funded up to $100,000. Costs over the $100,000 are shared 50/50 with the non-federal sponsor.  Final design (plans and specifications) and  costs are 65% Federal, 35% non-Federal. The construction cost varies.

How to Request Assistance. For more information on our small flood damage reduction program, please call the Outreach Coordinator, at (313)-226-3387. Requests for assistance should be in the form of a letter submitted from a state or local government agency at the address shown below.

 

 

Sample Letter of Intent for a Section 205 Flood Risk Management Project

 

  (LETTERHEAD OF LOCAL SPONSOR)

 

U. S. Army Corps of Engineers - Detroit District

Chief of Planning Office, 7th Floor

477 Michigan Avenue

Detroit, MI 48226-2550

 

Dear Sir:

This letter is to seek the assistance of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers under (Reference the authority under which assistance is requested and identify the type and location of the problem.)

(Briefly describe your perception of the nature and severity of the problem.)

(Briefly describe the known issues which would affect the acceptability of any recommended solutions, from the perspective of municipal and local governments, and/or the public.)

We are aware as local sponsor that we will assume costs for lands, easements, right-of-way, relocations and disposal areas (LERRD) and/or assume costs to demonstrate ownership of such.  We also will assume responsibility for any operation and maintenance of the project. Your consideration of this request will be appreciated.  Please contact (name, address, telephone, etc.) for further coordination.

 

Sincerely,

AGENCY OFFICIAL

Continuing Authority Programs

Cost Share: Federal/Non-Federal Federal Project Limit

Section 206 Aquatic Ecosystem Restoration

65% / 35% design & const., 50% recreational features $10.0 million

 

Overview.Under the authority provided by Section 206 of the Water Resources Development Act of 1996, the Corps may plan, design and build projects to restore aquatic ecosystems for fish and wildlife. Projects must improve the quality of the environment, be in the public interest, demonstrate cost effectivness and be no more than $10.0 million in total cost. Recreation projects, if justified, may be included in the total project, but they may not increase the federal share of the total project by more than 10 percent. Additionally, projects should not be formulated for recreation and recreation should not detract from ecosystem benefits.

Project Process. The process for Section 206 projects begins after a non-federal sponsor requests Corps of Engineers assistance under the program. When funding is available, the Corps of Engineers prepares a feasibility study, beginning with an estimate of the overall scope and cost of the study and a determination of whether the project is in the federal interest. The feasibility study formulates alternatives to achieve the restoration, evaluates the environmental effects of the alternatives, documents the project requirements, and provides a scope and cost estimate for project implementation. If the feasibility report recommends a plan for implementation, the Corps of Engineers prepares project plans and specifications and obtains any required federal permits. The Corps of Engineers then manages construction of the project by a private contractor.

Cost Sharing. The Corps of Engineers provides the first $100,000 of feasibility study costs. A non-federal sponsor must contribute 50 percent of the cost of the feasibility study after the first $100,000 of expenditures, 35 percent of the cost of design and construction, 50 percent of the cost of recreational features and 100 percent of the cost of operation and maintenance. The sponsor receives a credit for the value of real estate necessary to implement the project. The entire non-federal share of the project cost may be credited as work in kind, but, to receive credit, the services must be provided after a formal Feasibility Study Cost Sharing Agreement or Project Cooperation Agreement is signed.

 

Study Cost Project Cost

The feasibility study is cost shared 50% federal, 50% non-federal after the first $100,000 in study costs. The first $100,000 in study cost is federally funded.

Design and construction cost are 65% federal 35% non-federal

 

How to Request Assistance. For more information on our ecosytem restoration program, please call the Outreach Coordinator, at (313)-226-3387. Requests for assistance should be in the form of a Letter submitted from a state or local government agency to the address shown below.

Non-federal sponsors must be public agencies or national non-profit organizations capable of undertaking future requirements for operation, maintenance, repair, replacement and rehabilitation (OMRR&R), or may be any non-profit organization if there are no future requirements for OMRR&R. All potential sponsors must be able to provide any required lands, easements, rights-of-way, relocations and dredged or excavated material disposal areas (LERRD). The affected local government must consent to the non-profit entity being a sponsor.

 

 

Sample Letter of Intent for a Section 206 Ecosystem Restoration.

 

(LETTERHEAD OF LOCAL SPONSOR)

 

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers – Detroit District

Chief of Planning Office, 7th Floor

477 Michigan Avenue

Detroit, MI 48226-2550

 

Dear Sir:

This letter is to seek the assistance of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers under (Reference the authority under which assistance is requested and identify the type and location of the problem.)

(Briefly describe your perception of the nature and severity of the problem.)

(Briefly describe the known issues which would affect the acceptability of any recommended solutions, from the perspective of municipal and local governments, and/or the public.)

We are aware as local sponsor that we will assume costs for lands, easements, right-of-way, relocations and disposal areas (LERRD) and/or assume costs to demonstrate ownership of such.  We also will assume responsibility for any operation and maintenance of the project. Your consideration of this request will be appreciated.  Please contact (name, address, telephone, etc.) for further coordination.

 

Sincerely,

AGENCY OFFICIAL

 

Continuing Authority Programs

Cost Share: Federal/Non-Federal Federal Project Limit

Section 208 Snagging and Clearing for Flood Risk Management 

Varies $500,000

Overview. Section 208 of the 1954 Flood Control Act provides authority for the Corps of Engineers for channel clearing and excavation, with limited embankment construction by the use of materials from the clearing operation to reduce nuisance flood risk caused by debris and minor shoaling of rivers. The maximum federal cost for the project development and construction is $500,000 and each project must be economically justified, environmentally sound, and feasible.

Cost Sharing Requirements. The feasibility study is 100 percent federally funded up to $100,000. Costs over $100,000 are shared equally with the non-federal sponsor. Up to one-half of the non-federal share can be in the form of in-kind services. Costs for preparation of plans and specifications are shared at 65 percent federal/35 percent non-federal; the construction cost varies between 30% and 65% federal. The non-federal share of construction consists of provision of any necessary lands, easements, rights-of-way, relocations and disposal areas (LERRD), plus a cash contribution of 5% of the total project costs. In the event that the LERRD, plus 5% cash, does not equal at least 35 percent of the total project cost, the non-federal sponsor must contribute additional cash to equal the non-federal share.

Project Process. The Corps conducts an initial appraisal early in the feasibility study to determine whether the project meets program criteria and provides a basis for determining scope and cost of an entire feasibility study. The solution must be economically feasible and environmentally acceptable. If an acceptable alternative is identified in the feasibility study, the Corps prepares plans and specifications, then manages construction of the project.

 

Study Cost Project Cost
The feasibility study is 100% federally funded up to $100,000. Costs over the $100,000 are shared 50/50 with the non-federal sponsor.  Final design (plans and specifications)  costs are 65% Federal, 35% non-Federal. Construction cost varies

 

How to Request Assistance. For more information on our clearing ans snagging projects, please call the Outreach Coordinator, at (313)-226-3387. Requests for assistance should be in the form of a Letter submitted from a state or local government agency to at the address shown below.

 

 

 

 

 

Sample Letter of Intent for Section 208 Clearing and Snagging Projects.

 

 

 

(LETTERHEAD OF LOCAL SPONSOR)

 

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers – Detroit District

Chief of Planning Office, 7th Floor

477 Michigan Avenue

Detroit, MI 48226-2550

 

Dear Sir:

This letter is to seek the assistance of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers under (Reference the authority under which assistance is requested and identify the type and location of the problem.)

(Briefly describe your perception of the nature and severity of the problem.)

(Briefly describe the known issues which would affect the acceptability of any recommended solutions, from the perspective of municipal and local governments, and/or the public.)

We are aware as local sponsor that we will assume costs for lands, easements, right-of-way, relocations and disposal areas (LERRD) and/or assume costs to demonstrate ownership of such.  We also will assume responsibility for any operation and maintenance of the project. Your consideration of this request will be appreciated.  Please contact (name, address, telephone, etc.) for further coordination.

 

Sincerely,

AGENCY OFFICIAL

Continuing Authority Programs

Cost Share: Federal/Non-Federal Federal Project Limit

Section 103 Small Hurricane and Storm Damage Reduction Projects (Beach Erosion)

65% / 35% $5.0 million

Overview. Section 103 of the 1962 River and Harbor Act authorizes the Corps of Engineers to study, design, and construct small coastal storm damage reduction projects in partnership with non-federal government agencies, such as cities, counties, special authorities, or units of state government. Projects are planned and designed under this authority to provide the same complete storm damage reduction project that would be provided under specific congressional authorizations. The maximum federal cost for planning, design, and construction of any one project is $5,000,000. Each project must be economically justified, environmentally sound, and technically feasible. Hurricane and storm damage reduction projects are not limited to any particular type of improvement. Beach nourishment (structural) and floodproofing (non-structural) are examples of storm damage reduction projects constructed utilizing the Section 103 authority.

Cost Sharing Requirements. The feasibility study is 100% federally funded up to $100,000. Costs over $100,000 are shared equally with the non-federal sponsor. Up to one-half of the non-federal share can be in the form of in-kind services. Costs for preparation of plans and specifications and construction are shared at 65 percent federal/35 percent non-federal. The non-federal share of construction consists of provision of any necessary lands, easements, rights-of-way, relocations and disposal areas (LERRD), plus a cash contribution of 5% of the total project costs. In the event that the value of LERRD, plus 5% cash, does not equal at least 35% of the total project cost, the non-federal sponsor must contribute additional cash to equal 35%.

Project Process. The Corps conducts an initial appraisal early in the feasibility study to determine whether the project meets program criteria, determination of federal interest and provides a basis for determining scope and cost of an entire feasibility study. The solution must be economically feasible and environmentally acceptable. If an acceptable alternative is identified in the feasibility study, the Corps prepares plans and specifications, then manages construction of the project.

 

Study Cost Project Cost
The feasibility study is 100% federally funded up to $100,000. Costs over the $100,000 are shared 50/50 with the non-federal sponsor.  Final design (plans and specifications) and construction costs are 65% Federal, 35% non-Federal.

How to Request Assistance. For more information on our storm damage reduction program, call the Outreach Coordinator, at (313)-226-3387. Requests for assistance should be in the form of a letter submitted from a state or local government agency to the address shown below.

 

Sample Letter of Intent for Section 103 Hurricane & Storm Damage Reduction

                              

(LETTERHEAD OF LOCAL SPONSOR)

 

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers – Detroit District

Chief of Planning Office, 7th Floor

477 Michigan Avenue

Detroit, MI 48226-2550

 

Dear Sir:

This letter is to seek the assistance of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers under (Reference the authority under which assistance is requested and identify the type and location of the problem.)

(Briefly describe your perception of the nature and severity of the problem.)

(Briefly describe the known issues which would affect the acceptability of any recommended solutions, from the perspective of municipal and local governments, and/or the public.)

We are aware as local sponsor that we will assume costs for lands, easements, right-of-way, relocations and disposal areas (LERRD) and/or assume costs to demonstrate ownership of such.  We also will assume responsibility for any operation and maintenance of the project. Your consideration of this request will be appreciated.  Please contact (name, address, telephone, etc.) for further coordination.

 

Sincerely,

AGENCY OFFICIAL

 

 

Other Programs

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Other Programs

Cost Share: Federal/Non-Federal

Federal Project Limit

Flood Plain Management Services (FPMS) 100% Federal for eligible entities, with exceptions N/A

 

Overview. The Flood Plain Management Services (FPMS) Program was developed by the Corps of Engineers specifically to address the need of people who live and work in the flood plain to know about the flood hazard and the actions that they can take to reduce property damage and to prevent the loss of life caused by flooding.

Authority, Objective, and Scope. The program's authority stems from Section 206 of the 1960 Flood Control Act (PL 86-645), as amended.  Its objective is to foster public understanding of the options for dealing with flood hazards and to promote prudent use and management of the Nation's flood plains.

Land use adjustments based on proper planning and the employment of techniques for controlling and reducing flood damages provide a rational way to balance the advantages and disadvantages of human settlement on flood plains. These adjustments are the key to sound flood plain management.

Types of Assistance. The FPMS Program provides the full range of technical services and planning guidance that is needed to support effective flood plain management.

  • General Technical Services. The program develops or interprets site-specific data on obstructions to flood flows, flood formation and timing; and the extent, duration, and frequency of flooding. It also provides information on natural and cultural flood plain resources of note, and flood loss potentials before and after the use of flood plain management measures.
  • General Planning Guidance. On a larger scale, the program provides assistance and guidance in the form of "Special Studies" on all aspects of flood plain management planning including the possible impacts of off-flood plain land use changes on the physical, socio-economic, and environmental conditions of the flood plain. This can range from helping a community identify present or future flood plain areas and related problems, to a broad assessment of which of the various remedial measures may be effectively used.

Some of the most common types of Special Studies include:

    • Flood Plain Delineation/Flood Hazard Evaluation Studies
    • Dam Break Analysis Studies
    • Flood Warning/Preparedness Studies
    • Regulatory Floodway Studies
    • Comprehensive Flood Plain Management Studies
    • Flood Damage Reduction Studies
    • Urbanization Impact Studies
    • Stormwater Management Studies
    • Flood Proofing Studies
    • Inventory of Flood Prone Structures

The program also provides guidance and assistance for meeting standards of the National Flood Insurance Program and for conducting workshops and seminars on non-structural flood plain management measures, such as Flood Proofing.

Guides, Pamphlets, and Supporting Studies. Studies are conducted under the program to improve the methods and procedures for mitigating flood damages. Guides and pamphlets are also prepared on flood proofing techniques, flood plain regulations, flood plain occupancy, natural flood plain resources, and other related aspects of flood plain management.

The study findings and the guides and pamphlets are provided free-of-charge to Federal agencies, Indian Tribes, State, regional, and local governments and private citizens for their use in addressing the flood hazard.

Charges for Assistance. Upon request, program services are provided to State, regional, and local governments, Indian Tribes, and other non-Federal public agencies without charge.

Program services also are offered to non-water resource Federal agencies and to the private sector on a 100% cost recovery basis. For most of these requests, payment is required before services are provided. A schedule of charges is used to recover the cost of services taking up to one day to provide. Letter requests or signed agreements are used to charge for those that take longer.

All requestors are encouraged to furnish available field survey data, maps, historical flood information and the like, to help reduce the cost of services.

How to Request Assistance. Agencies, governments, organizations, and individuals interested in flood-related information or assistance can send an email to FPMS-Detroit@usace.army.mil. A letter request is required for assistance that involves developing new data, making a map, or preparing a report. A sample letter is included below.

 

 

Sample Letter for Flood Plain Management Services Assistance

 

(Date)

US Army Corps of Engineers
Detroit District FPMS Coordinator
477 Michigan Ave.
Detroit, MI  48226

Dear Sir:

This is in reference to your Flood Plain Management Services Program. We understand that Section 206 of the Flood Control Act of 1960, as amended, authorizes the Corps to help others mitigate flood losses. The [requesting agency or private entity] requests assistance for [body of water or waterway], located in [City, Township or Borough], in [County and State].

[Add brief paragraph describing problem or need].

Property descriptions, [site plans, maps and/or photographs] are enclosed. Upon your review of this initial request, we would like to discuss the availability of information, required schedule, and level of effort required (to negotiate the appropriate charge if applicable.) Please contact [Name, title, phone number] to arrange a further discussion of this request.

Signature of Cooperating Agency or Individual

 

Other Programs

Cost Share: Federal/Non-Federal

Federal Project Limit

Planning Assistance to States (PAS)
50% / 50% $500,000

 

Authority and Scope. Section 22 of the Water Resources Development Act (WRDA) of 1974, as amended, provides authority for the Corps of Engineers to assist the States, local governments, and other non-Federal entities in the preparation of comprehensive plans for the development, utilization, and conservation of water and related land. Section 208 of the Water Resources Development Act of 1992 amended the WRDA of 1974 to include Native American Tribes as equivalent to a State.

Funding. The Planning Assistance to States (PAS) Program is funded annually by Congress. Federal allotments for each State or Tribe from the nation-wide appropriation are limited to $500,000 annually, but typically are much less. Individual studies, of which there may be more than one per State or Tribe per year, generally cost $25,000 to $75,000. These studies are cost shared on a 50 percent federal-50 percent non-federal basis.

Program Development. The needed planning assistance is determined by the individual States and Tribes. Every year, each State and Tribe can provide the Corps of Engineers its request for studies under the program, and the Corps then accommodates as many studies as possible within the funding allotment. Typical studies are only planning level of detail; they do not include detailed design for project construction. The studies generally involve the analysis of existing data for planning purposes using standard engineering techniques although some data collection is often necessary. Most studies become the basis for State or Tribal and local planning decisions. To assist in expediting a request for Planning Assistance to States activities, sample letter and Cost Sharing Agreement are included.

 

Typical Studies. The program can encompass many types of studies dealing with water resources issues. Types of studies conducted in recent years under the program include the following:  

  • Water Supply and Demand Studies
  • Water Quality Studies
  • Environmental Conservation/Restoration Studies
  • Wetlands Evaluation Studies
  • Dam Safety/Failure Studies
  • Flood Damage Reduction Studies
  • Flood Plain Management Studies
  • Coastal Zone Management/Protection Studies
  • Harbor/Port Studies
  •  

    How to Request Assistance. State, local government, and Tribal officials who are interested in obtaining planning assistance under this Program can contact the appropriate Corps office for further details. Alternatively, interested parties can contact the appropriate State or Tribal Planning Assistance to States program manager to request assistance. In either case, the Corps will coordinate all requests for assistance with the State or Tribal Planning Assistance to States coordinator to ensure that studies are initiated on State or Tribal prioritized needs.

     

    PAS Program Manager: 313-226-2657

     

    Other Programs

    Cost Share: Federal/Non-Federal

    Federal Project Limit

    Great Lakes Fishery & Ecosystem Restoration (GLFER) 65% / 35% $10 million dollars

    Overview. Section 506 of the Water Resources Development Act of 1996 authorizes the USACE to participate in planning, engineering, design and construction of projects to restore degraded ecosystem structure, function and dynamic processes to a more naturall condition. Such projects include the removal of lowhead dams as a way to improve water quality and fish and wildlife habitat. Projects require partnering with a non-federal sponsor that may be a public agency, state or local government, private interest, or non-profit environmental organization.

    Process. Following a request from a potential non-federal sponsor, a Preliminary Restoraton Plan (PRP) is prepared to document federal interest.  Next, a federally funded feasibility study is conducted to determine if there is a federal interest in the project.  If the cost of the cost of the feasibility study is less htan $1.0 million, this phase includes preparation of plans and specifications. If not, a Detailed Project Report (DPR) is required before initiating plans and specifications. Finally, a Project Cooperation Agreement (PCA) is executed between the Corps and the non-federal sponsor and construction begins.

    Cost Sharing Requirements. The preliminary Restoration Plan (PRP) is federally funded and limited to $25,000. The feasibility study is also federally funded. Costs for planning, design and construction are subject to a 35 percent non-federal contribution, up to 50 percent of which may be in the form of lands, easements, rights-of-ways, relocations, and dredge material disposal areas need for construction.  Costs of O&M are funded 100 percent by the non-federal sponsor.

    Study Cost Project Cost
    The feasibility study is 100% federally funded.

    Non-federal sponsor pays 35% of total project design & construction cost and 100% of O&M costs.

    How to Request Assistance. For more information on our fishery and ecosystem restoration program, call the Chief of the Plan Formulation Branch, at (313) 226-6758. Requests for assistance should be in the form of a Letter submitted from a state or local government agency to the address shown below.

     

    Letter of Intent for Section 506 Great Lakes Fishery and Ecosystem Restoration

     

    (Letterhead of local sponsor)

    Plan Formulation Branch
    Detroit District
    US Army Corps of Engineers
    477 Michigan Avenue
    Detroit, MI 48226

    Dear Sir,

    We have identified a potential opportunity for (type of fishery and ecosystem restoration project). We request that the Corps investigate the possibility of preparing a feasibility study under its Great Lakes Fishery & Ecosystem Restoration Authority, Section 506 of the Water Resources Development Act of 1996, as amended, to formulate a restoration plan.

    We believe this project would restore (type of benefits, e.g. wetlands, fish habitat).

    We understand that the study will investigate alternative solutions to identify a plan to restore or create aquatic and ecologically related habitats. I also understand our obligations as local sponsor under the Section 506 Program, including the cost-sharing requirement of 35 percent of the project construction costs in excess of the normal (baseline) costs of the federal navigation project. We intend to pursue budgetary actions so that funds will be available to meet our cost sharing requirements at the time needed by the Corps to advertise a construction contract.

    The (name of agency or community) has designated (name of local contact at agency and phone number) as the point of contact for this project.

    Sincerely, 

    (Agency Official)

    Other Programs

    Cost Share: Federal/Non-Federal

    Federal Project Limit

    Great Lakes Regional Sediment Management (GLRSM)

    NA N/A

     

    Overview.  As water resource projects become more and more complex, there is a growing emphasis on the ability to implement effective Regional Sediment Management (RSM).  RSM uses understanding of sediment systems to provide a context for managing projects and activities involving sand and other sediments.  It recognizes sediment as a resource that is integral to economic and environmental vitality.  Stakeholder teams identify inter-related sediment resource needs and opportunities, and collaboratively leverage programs, data, information and other resources to balance sediment-related objectives over a time.  There is not a specific authority for RSM, but a number of legislative authorities and Civil Works policies support implementation of regional approaches to sediment management within the Corps.  The authorities include both broad authorities that allow and encourage regional or comprehensive studies, approaches, and perspectives, as well as authorities specific to sediment and sand management, storm damage reduction, shoreline erosion protection, and management of dredged material.  Several Corps Civil Works policies and guidance documents also support regional or comprehensive approaches that consider projects, problem solving, and management in the context of broader systems, and advocate regional coordination of projects and studies within the Corps and with partners and stakeholders.

    Benefits.  Cost savings result from reduced rehandling of material, extended dredging cycles, sharing equipment to reduce mobilization and demobiliztion costs, sharing information for regional analyses, and avoided duplication of data collection.  RSM also improves sediment regimes due to reintroduction of sediment into "sand starved" littoral systems, reducing the requirement for beach nourishment and sustaining habitat for threatened and endangered species.  It sets a framework for shared regional-scale data management systems, models, and other tools to improve project-level decisions and help achieve greater consistency in analytical results among studies and projects within a region.  Finally, it helps improve interagency and stakeholder relationships with opportunities for collaboratively leveraging financial and manpower resources in data collection and analysis, tool development, project implementation, along with collaboration and coordination that streamline regulatory processes.

    How to Request Assistance.  For more information about programs related to RMS, call (313) 226-3387

     

    Other Programs

    Cost Share: Federal/Non-Federal

    Federal Project Limit

    Great Lakes Remedial Action Plans (GLRAP) 65% / 35% N/A

     

    Overview. Authorized under Section 401(a) of the Water Resources Development Act of 1990, as amended, the program is intented to provide technical support to states and local organizations in the development and implementation of Remedial Action Plans (RAPs) at Great Lakes Areas of Concern (AOCs). A RAP is developed in three stages: Stage I identifies and assesses use impairments and the sources of the stresses from all media in the AOC; Stage II identifies proposed remedial actions and their method of implementation; and Stage III documents evidence that uses have been restored. It is important to note that, in practice, these stages often overlap, and that the RAPs often become iterative documents, representing the current state of knowledge, planning and remedial activity in the AOC.

    Cost Sharing. This is not a grant program and a cost-sharing agreement is required. Partners may include state or local governmental agencies or non-profit organizations. Support is provided by Corps districts and their contractors. Support is cost-shared 35 percent non-federal/ 65 percent federal. The non-federal share may come from state and local agencies, non-profit groups or private sources. In addition, the non-federal share may include in-kind services in lieu of cash.

    How to Request Assistance. To utilize this program, prospective partners should contact the appropriate Corps district office to discuss the type and scope of support desired. The district office will develop a budget, schedule and cost-sharing agreement for approval by the sponsor.  For the Detroit District call (313) 226-2283 for more information, or follow the sample request letter template below.

     

    Sample Request for Great Lakes Remedial Action Plan Program Assistance

    Detroit District 
    US Army Corps of Engineers
    477 Michigan Ave., Detroit, MI  48226

    Dear Sir:

    In accordance with the provisions of Section 401 of the Water Resources Development Act of 1990, as amended, which provides authority for the Corps of Engineers to provide technical, planning and engineering assistance in the development and implementation of Remedial Action Plans (RAP), the (Name of Local Sponsor: State or State entity, or name of city, county, etc.) requests assistance for (body of water or waterway in Area of Concern, AOC), located in (city, township or borough) in (County and State).

    A proposed Plan of Study/Scope of Work, including site location map and/or photographs, is included as an attachment (Enclosure 1). The proposed study/work is identified as part of the (Planning/Development/Implementation) of the RAP for the identified AOC (documentation attached in Enclosure 2). We understand that the identified study/work is a cooperative arrangement between the Corps and (name of cooperating agency/governmental unit) which requires a local 35 percent funding match. Non-federal cash, in-kind services, or a combination of cash and services can be used for the match.

    For further information or questions regarding this request for Great Lakes Remedial Action Plan Program assistance, please contact (name) at (phone number).

    Sincerely,

    Agency/Governmental Unit

    Other Programs

    Cost Share: Federal/Non-Federal

    Federal Project Limit

    Great Lakes Tributary Modeling Program (GLTMP) 100% Federal N/A

    Overview.  In 1996, Congress created the Great Lakes Tributary Model program through Section 516(e) of the Water Resources Development Act of 1996. This authority enables the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to develop sediment transport models to assist state and local agencies with the planning and implementation of measures for soil conservation and nonpoint source pollution prevention. Models can be developed at all tributaries to the Great Lakes that discharge to federal navigation channels or Areas of Concern (AOCs). The ultimate goal of this program is to reduce the loading of sediments and pollutants to tributaries in order to enhance Great Lakes water quality, help delist Great Lakes AOCs, and reduce the need for navigation dredging. 

    Process.  Before any model development is started for a particular tributary or watershed, a working group is convened with representatives of agencies and organizations from the watershed, including groups representing soil and water conservation, Remedial Action Plans (RAPs), navigation, municipal and county planning agencies, state and federal resource agencies. This working group helps to define the scope and focus for the model to meet individual watershed needs.

    For More Information.  Information on tributary models and reports are available online at: www.glc.org/tributary/

    Point of Contact.  Technical POC, Hydraulics & Hydrology, Detroit District of the US Army Corps of Engineers, (313) 226-6791

    Partial List of Projects under the Great Lakes Tributary Modeling Program.

    • State Tributary Status Uses of Model
    • Illinois Waukegan River Under development Evaluate bank erosion and restoration of urban river
    • Indiana Burns Ditch/Trail Creek Completed Land-use planning and conservation to reduce nonpoint pollution
    • Michigan Battle Creek Under development Evaluate agricultural BMPs and prioritize CRP projects
    • Clinton River Completed Evaluate urban stormwater management and bank erosion options
    • Grand River 
    • Rouge River Under development Assess impacts of dam removal on sediment erosion and transport
    • St. Joseph River Completed
    • Minnesota Knife River Initial scoping
    • Nemadji River Completed Evaluate impacts of forestry practices on bank erosion
    • New York Buffalo River Completed Evaluate pollution prevention and sediment cleanup options
    • Cattaraugus Creek Under development Evaluate impacts of urban development on erosion/nonpoint pollution
    • Cayuga Creek Under development Evaluate impacts of urban development on erosion/nonpoint pollution
    • Oak Orchard Creek Under development Evaluate buffer strips and other BMPs
    • Ohio Auglaize River Completed Prioritizing sites for buffer strips and other conservation measures
    • Blanchard River Under development Evaluate agricultural BMPs and wetlands restoration
    • Cuyahoga River Completed Planning conservation actions and forestry management
    • Swan Creek Under development Evaluate impacts of urban development on erosion/nonpoint pollution
    • Pennsylvania Mill and Cascade Creeks Completed Plan stream restoration and other actions for AOC delisting
    • Wisconsin Manitowoc River Under development Evaluate effectiveness of agricultural BMPs
    • Menominee River Completed Evaluate impacts of urban growth and river restoration options
    • Siskiwit River (Cornucopia) Initial scoping
      Whittlesey Creek Under development Restoring flow and fishery access in high value stream