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  • Great Lakes water levels reaching peaks for the year

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Detroit District, announces each of the Great Lakes, except Lake Superior, have likely reached their peak water levels for the year and are predicted to decline. Lakes Michigan-Huron set another new monthly mean record high water level in July, however the water level is expected to slowly drop the rest of the year. Water levels on Lakes St. Clair, Erie and Ontario all continued to decline last month, with no new records set on those lakes in July. The water level of Lake Superior is expected to peak next month before entering its period of typical seasonal decline. “While we expect water levels to decline across most of the Great Lakes, levels still remain extremely high,” said John Allis, chief of the Great Lakes Hydraulics and Hydrology Office, Detroit District.
  • Great Lakes water levels still setting records

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Detroit District, announces that Lakes Michigan, Huron, St. Clair and Erie set new monthly mean water level records for May 2020. These water level records were previously set in 1986 on Lakes Michigan and Huron and just last year in 2019 on Lakes St. Clair and Erie. As we enter the summer months, all of the lakes are either in their period of seasonal rise or are reaching their peak, except Lake Ontario, which will likely begin its seasonal decline this month. Although most of the month was dry, the middle of May brought heavy rainfall to some areas of the basin, resulting in a wetter than average month for the Michigan-Huron and Erie basins. In the coming months, water levels are projected to continue to be near or above record high water levels on all of the lakes, except Lake Ontario. Significant erosion and flooding continues in many locations as water levels remain extremely high. “The water level of Lakes Michigan and Huron has now risen above the peak level that was reached last year,” said John Allis, chief of the Great Lakes Hydraulics and Hydrology Office, Detroit District.
  • Shutterbugs invited to submit photos from Great Lakes sites

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Detroit District, invites the public to participate in their annual photo contest. Entries are now being accepted through 11:59 p.m. June 7 and should feature Great Lakes’ sites such as the Soo Locks, Duluth Ship Canal, piers, breakwaters or federal harbors on the Great Lakes. The top 12 photographers will have their photo included in a 2021 downloadable calendar and the top three photographers, determined by social media vote, will receive a plaque with their winning photo, provided by the Soo Locks Visitors Center Association.
  • Record water levels set, watching spring

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Detroit District, announces that Lakes Michigan, Huron, St. Clair and Erie set new monthly mean water level records for April 2020, which were previously set in 1985 or 1986. All of the lakes are either in their period of seasonal rise or are reaching their peak, as we continue into the late spring and summer. Although the end of April brought heavy rainfall to some areas of the basin, the month as a whole was quite dry for the Great Lakes region. During the spring, water levels typically rise on the Great Lakes due to increased rainfall and runoff. In the coming months, water levels are projected to continue to be near or above record high water levels on all of the lakes, except Lake Ontario. Significant erosion and flooding continues in many locations as water levels remain extremely high.
  • Water Levels to remain high during seasonal rise

    DETROIT- The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Detroit District, announces that Lakes Michigan, Huron, St. Clair and Erie set new monthly mean water level records for March 2020, which were previously set in 1986. All of the lakes are now in their period of seasonal rise and will continue to rise toward their peaks, which are projected to occur in the late spring or summer. March was fairly wet in the Great Lakes region with precipitation near to above average across the region. During the spring, water levels on the Great Lakes are usually in a period of seasonal rise due to increased rainfall and runoff. Water levels are expected to rise toward their seasonal peaks over the coming months and will continue to be near or above record high water levels. Significant erosion continues in many locations as water levels remain extremely high. Strong storm systems and resulting large waves have led to substantial erosion along much of the Great Lakes coastline. “After a generally drier month of February, March brought a return to wetter conditions experienced across the Great Lakes basin,” said John Allis, chief of the Great Lakes Hydraulics and Hydrology Office, Detroit District. “During this period of seasonal rise for the Great Lakes, near or above record high water levels will continue to cause impacts along the shoreline.”
  • Agreement signed to help stop flooding in Detroit

    DETROIT – The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Detroit District, has signed an agreement to assist the City of Detroit with direct assistance to fight against flood events expected during this upcoming spring and summer seasons. The cooperation agreement, signed electronically in light of COVID-19, will provide direct assistance to the City of Detroit in the Jefferson-Chalmers and Jefferson Village neighborhoods. “Even while the Detroit District and the Corps nation-wide is surging to help the nation respond to this pandemic, we're working diligently to help the City of Detroit and State of Michigan protect our communities from historically high water levels,” said Lt. Col. Greg Turner, district engineer, Detroit District.
  • The Soo Locks open as 2020 shipping season begins

    DETROIT – The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Detroit District, announces the Soo Locks in Sault Ste. Marie, Mich., opened today Wednesday, March 25, marking the beginning of the 2020 Great Lakes shipping season. The up-bound Motor Vessel H. Lee White, 704-foot long freighter, is the first ship to enter the Poe Lock. It is coming from Sturgeon Bay, Michigan and headed to Superior, Wisconsin to load cargo.
  • Great Lakes water levels remain high going into the spring

    DETROIT- The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Detroit District, announces that despite a dry month of February across the Great Lakes basin, water levels on each of the Great Lakes remain very high going into the spring. Lakes Superior, Michigan, Huron, and Erie set new monthly records for February 2020. The records were previously set on lakes Superior, Michigan and Huron in 1986, and in 1987 on Lake Erie.
  • President’s 2021 budget provides more than $181 million for district civil works projects including $123 million for New Lock at the Soo

    The President’s Budget for fiscal year 2021 includes more than $5.9 billion in discretionary funding for the Civil Works program of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (see release at: Corps of Engineers, HQ Website – www.usace.army.mil) with more than $181 million for Detroit District projects around the Great Lakes. The Civil Works budget funds the operation and maintenance program, which includes the maintenance of federal shipping channels on the Great Lakes, maintenance of federal structures and the operation and maintenance of the Soo locks, in Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. Incorporated in the budget is funding that will be used across the district's jurisdiction in Indiana, Minnesota, Michigan, and Wisconsin.
  • Record high water levels to continue in 2020

    DETROIT- The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Detroit District, announces that January 2020 water